Aggressive Driving: Asking for Trouble

Aggressive Driving: Asking for Trouble

An 86-year-old Washington, D.C., resident was hit by a car traveling 90 mph on a city street. Aggressive drivers are becoming more visible, according to a Media and Injury Prevention Program at the University of Southern California. "Aggressive driving is now the most common way of driving," says co-director Sandra Ball-Rokeach. "It's not just a few crazies -- it's a subculture of driving."A recent study by the Automobile Association of America (AAA) revealed that 44 percent of drivers in Washington, DC, worry more about aggressive drivers than about drunken drivers. Stories of aggressive drivers chasing, punching or shooting their victims are common. But you might avoid becoming a victim if you know how to remain calm and avoid acting upon your feelings. Sure, people cut you off, honk their horns or pass you on the right, but reacting angrily only makes matters worse. Results can be deadly.